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mandmburke
01-09-2009, 07:29 AM
Hey There,
I picked up a used 2005 660 Rhino and I love it. The only problem I have is with starting the thing after it has sit for a couple of weeks. (unfortunately I don't get to drive it as much as I'd like to ) I talked to the dealer and he said that because of where the fuel pump is located the fuel drains down the line and then it takes a lot of cranking to get the fuel back up. He suggested jumping the battery when it is started so it doesn't lessen the battery life by all the cranking, or squirting some starting fluid to get it to fire and get the gas moving. Any other suggestions?
Thanks,
Michael

jrspawn
01-11-2009, 09:27 PM
Replace your fuel filter first. If you havent done so lately this will help some. Also if you have the time, remove the fuel pickup from the tank. Sometimes youll find some plastic shaving in the tank that might block up the pickup/fuel lines. Make sure all your fuel/vaccum lines are also in god shape and attatched. Other than that the vaccum fuel pump design sucks when letting it sit for some time. It takes some extra cranking to get it going.

I installed an electric fuel pump on my rhino and love it. The engine fires up as soon as you hit the key hot or cold or even if its sat for weeks. Its no that hard to switch it over to an electric pump setup either, let me know if your interested and need any help.

Thank you
Justin

stoopidbot
01-11-2009, 09:35 PM
Try pumping the gas 7-10 times then pull the choke and try.

mandmburke
01-12-2009, 05:16 PM
Justin,
Thanks so much for the idea about the electric fuel pump, it makes a lot of sense. I would like to give it a try. I'll try the other suggestions this weekend. If you could let me know what kind of machine you got the fuel pump from and any other tips on installing it, that would be GREAT!
Thanks Again,
Michael

mandmburke
01-13-2009, 07:50 AM
After some research, I found that Black Rhino Performance sells an electric fuel pump kit that mounts near the gas tank and I guess still utilizes the factory pump as well. I also found several people selling the Mikuni high flow vacuum pump that replaces the stock pump. If anyone has expericene with either of these I'd appreciate some feedback. My Rhino is bone stock and I intend on keeping it that way, and not sure if the high flow will bring up the gas quicker after it has been sitting.
Thanks Again,
Michael

Pro Wrench
01-27-2009, 04:18 AM
The vacuum pump only flows fuel when the engine is turning so after sitting a few weeks your situation is 100% normal. The easiest way to start it is apply the choke and crank the engine for 10 seconds and pause 10 seconds then repeat until it starts. DO NOT USE THE THROTTLE PEDAL! It reduces the vacuum which reduces the fuel supply.
Also a fresh NGK Iridium spark plug helps with quick starting.

Electric fuel pumps are a huge mistake for many reasons..

stoopidbot
01-27-2009, 05:37 AM
Originally posted by Pro Wrench
The vacuum pump only flows fuel when the engine is turning so after sitting a few weeks your situation is 100% normal. The easiest way to start it is apply the choke and crank the engine for 10 seconds and pause 10 seconds then repeat until it starts. DO NOT USE THE THROTTLE PEDAL! It reduces the vacuum which reduces the fuel supply.
Also a fresh NGK Iridium spark plug helps with quick starting.

Electric fuel pumps are a huge mistake for many reasons.. Let's see what was wrong with your statement. Hold the key for 10 second intervals? Are you trying to drain your battery or fry your starter?

Why wouldn't you use the gas pedal? I do that EVERYTIME with the 660. Pump the gas a few times, pull the choke and then start it. I have never used your veryy foolish method.

Pro Wrench
01-28-2009, 09:47 PM
Originally posted by stoopidbot
Let's see what was wrong with your statement. Hold the key for 10 second intervals? Are you trying to drain your battery or fry your starter?

Why wouldn't you use the gas pedal? I do that EVERYTIME with the 660. Pump the gas a few times, pull the choke and then start it. I have never used your veryy foolish method.

What you do with your machine is your business, since you have never used my "foolish method" I doubt you have ever opened the owners manual either.
If your starter motor and battery can't turn the engine over for 10 seconds I recommend you have it inspected by a qualified mechanic because you have some problems.
The reason you don't pump the throttle? 2 reasons. First, He stated it has been sitting for a few weeks each time, so the fuel pick-up line, fuel filter, fuel pump and carburetor are not primed with fuel. The fuel pump on the 660's is vacuum operated, so it only pumps fuel to the carburetor while the engine is turning over. Opening the throttle while cranking the engine reduces the vacuum which reduces the pumps efficiency and simply requires more engine cranking to fill the fuel pick-up, fuel filter, float bowl. choke circuit inside the carburetor etc. before a single atom reaches the combustion chamber to be fired by the spark plug...
Second "pumping" the throttle is simply not necessary on anything built withing the last few decades unless it is in a very poor state of tune.

Happy trails..

stoopidbot
01-29-2009, 06:16 AM
Originally posted by Pro Wrench
What you do with your machine is your business, since you have never used my "foolish method" I doubt you have ever opened the owners manual either.
If your starter motor and battery can't turn the engine over for 10 seconds I recommend you have it inspected by a qualified mechanic because you have some problems.
The reason you don't pump the throttle? 2 reasons. First, He stated it has been sitting for a few weeks each time, so the fuel pick-up line, fuel filter, fuel pump and carburetor are not primed with fuel. The fuel pump on the 660's is vacuum operated, so it only pumps fuel to the carburetor while the engine is turning over. Opening the throttle while cranking the engine reduces the vacuum which reduces the pumps efficiency and simply requires more engine cranking to fill the fuel pick-up, fuel filter, float bowl. choke circuit inside the carburetor etc. before a single atom reaches the combustion chamber to be fired by the spark plug...
Second "pumping" the throttle is simply not necessary on anything built withing the last few decades unless it is in a very poor state of tune.

Happy trails.. We got lines crossed or something. I never said pump the gas while cranking the motor. And would you hold the starter cranking on your car for 10 seconds straight?

Everytime I ever had problems starting my 660 it was due to extreme cold or had been sitting for a while. I would pump the gas a good 10 times. Pull the choke and turn the key. I have never had to crank the starter for 10 second intervals.

jrspawn
01-29-2009, 01:23 PM
pro wrench, please explain why an electric fuel pump is a huge mistake. im very curious on this one.

Pro Wrench
01-30-2009, 09:37 PM
Originally posted by jrspawn
pro wrench, please explain why an electric fuel pump is a huge mistake. im very curious on this one.

Maybe "overkill" or "not necessary" would have been better words to use if you left the fuel line plumbing completely stock and simply replaced the vacuum pump with the electric. But most trash the stock recirculating type system when replacing the pump and simply plumb it from the tank to the pump to the carburetor. This can cause numerous problems ranging from a simple dead battery from leaving it on, or worse a bent rod from hydraulic lock if it fills the cylinder full of fuel and you crank it over, which could result in a long walk back to the truck along followed by a hefty repair bill.

The stock pump is very reliable and pumps far more gallons per hour (gph) than the Rhino can burn. Any supply problems are usually cured with a clean fuel filter or pick-up tube inside the tank unclogged. Many Rhinos suffer from these ailments as it's common to find trash inside the fuel tank like plastic shavings from manufacturing, blobs of silicone from assembly even leaves from being stored outdoors & unsealed at the plant prior to assembly have been found.

In a nutshell If you find a low enough GPM electric pump and then replace the stock pump with it and wire it to only run with the key on then it should work fine. But it's just so unnecessary, a step backwards to me. Similar to swapping your electronic ignition for a set of points.